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Posts from the ‘BC’ Category

Do BC nurses face higher risk of violence than law enforcement?

This sponsored content in the Times-Colonist is bit misleading. Or perhaps a kinder way to say it would be “poorly worded”:

In the past decade, B.C. nurses experienced approximately 2862 time-loss injuries from violence, which were often the result of being kicked, hit or beaten by patients or residents of the facilities they work in. What’s perhaps more striking, though, is the fact that these nurses are at greater risk of injury from workplace violence than law enforcement and security workers.

Although violence is commonly associated with jobs in security and law enforcement, occupations in this field made up just 14 percent of all injuries that resulted from workplace violence, while nurses (including aides and health care assistants) accounted for more than 40 percent.

There are quite a few problems with comparing occupations like this. For example, one major issue is that these statistics only include a fraction of the law enforcement officers working in British Columbia. The RCMP officers from E Division are not included. These police officers from E Division – all of whom work in British Columbia – fall under the Canadian Labour Code rather than the BC Workers Compensation Act.

About a third of all RCMP officers work in E Division.  There are 18,000+ officers in the RCMP which would mean about 6000 RCMP officers in British Columbia. Obviously this creates a big gap in the WorkSafeBC data.

November / December issue of the 10-8 newsletter for Canadian police officers

The latest 10-8 newsletter is now online. Here are the highlights:

  • New Justice Appointed to Supreme Court
  • Manner Of Strip Search Matters: s.8 Charter Breached
  • Firearm Need Not Also Meet Definition Of Weapon
  • Lawful Arrest Neuters Civil Claim
  • Corraborating Sources Enhances Reliability
  • Police Conduct Assessed By What they Did, Not Could have Done
  • Watching Detainee Did Not Breach s. 10(b)
  • Police Owe No Duty To Investigate
  • Officers May Use Experience in Making Decisions
  • Cell Phone Search Incident To Arrest Lawful, But Limited
  • Information Compelling, Credible & Corroborated: RGB Satisfied
  • Reasonable Grounds Assessed At Time Of Arrest
  • Penile Swab & Fingernail Clippings Proper As Incident to Arrest

September / October issue of the 10-8 newsletter for Canadian police officers

Here are the highlights of the latest issue of the 10-8 newsletter for Canadian police officers:

  • Justification For Night Search Upheld: No Charter Breach
  • 22-Minute Advisement Delay Violated Rights: Cocaine Excluded
  • Production Order May Issue On Basis Of Reasonable Suspicion
  • 2013 Police Reported Crime
  • No-Knock Entry Justified: Exigent Circumstances Established
  • Arrest & Demand Required Separate Analysis
  • s.489 Authorizes Seizure of Material Unrelated To Warrant Offence
  • Demand To Be Made As Soon As Practicable, Not Forthwith
  • Crown Bears Burden Of Demonstrating Access Not Reasonably Feasible
  • Police Acted In Good Faith: Evidence Admissible
  • Back-up Officer’s Evidence Served as Corroboration

Mike Novakowski does an incredible job as the editor of these newsletters.

New rules at the BC Human Rights Tribunal

The British Columbia Human Rights Tribunal (BCHRT) has introduced new rules aimed at improving efficiency and the flow of complaints for both complainants and respondents. Here is a summary of the new rules, and  here are the full official rules.

Honour House in Vancouver

Recently I attended a RUSI presentation about Honour House. This resource is not well known in the law enforcement community.  I am posting it here in hopes that someone will benefit from it during a time of need: Honour House

Honour House Society is a refuge, a home away from home for Canadian Forces personnel, emergency services personnel and their families to stay, completely free of charge, while they are receiving medical care and treatment in the Metro Vancouver area.

These brave individuals, along with their families, sacrifice so much on a daily basis to protect our freedom and our everyday way of life. Honour House allows us the opportunity to show them that we care and how much we appreciate all that they do.

Located on a quiet tree-lined street in New Westminster, Honour House is a beautiful, fully renovated heritage home with 10 private bedrooms each with its own en-suite bathroom. The house has a large shared kitchen, living room, a media room, sun rooms and many other common spaces. The house is fully modernized and wheelchair accessible and is set in its own extensive and lovingly maintained grounds.

Honour house receives no direct funding and raises all of its operating costs through donations and fundraising. The house has one full time and one part time member of staff. Almost all of the work needed to keep Honour House running is carried out by our dedicated board of directors and our hard working team of volunteers.